Tagalog Numbers

Beginning Tagalog Vocabulary
Kusyo at Buyok , Manila Bulletin Online Edition

Counting (Cardinal) Numbers

Tagalog counting numbers basically follow either the Malay or Spanish root words. It is more common to hear Filipinos (even non-Tagalog speakers) use the Spanish-based counting numbers in telling time (e.g.ala una ng hapon) and occasionally when counting money (e.g., dies mil pesos).  

However, Tagalog speakers often use the Malay-based counting numbers with reference to weight (e.g.isang kilo), objects, things, and people (e.g., sampung daliri, limang kotse, tatlong magkakapatid), as well as counting money (e.g.sampung piso, dalawang daang piso, isang libong piso).   

It is interesting to note that in telling time, Filipinos even mix the Malay and Spanish form very often. For example, it is common to hear Tagalog-speakers say “sampung minuto bago mag-alas diyes ng umaga” (it is now ten minutes before ten in the morning). One could even hear radio announcers in Tagalog-speaking regions of the Philippines tell time in this manner, even radio stations in Metro Manila.

Roman NumeralTagalog
(Malay root)
Tagalog
(Spanish Root)
English
1isa
(satu)
uno
(uno)
one
2dalawa
(dua)
dos
(dos)
two
3tatlo
(tiga)
tres
(tres)
three
4apat
(empat)
kwatro
(cuatro)
four
5lima
(lima)
sinko
(cinco)
five
6anim
(enam)
sais
(seis)
six
7pitosyete
(siete)
seven
8walootso
(ocho)
eight
9siyamnuwebe
(nueve)
nine
10sampudiyes
(diez)
ten
11labing-isaonseeleven
12labindalawadosetwelve
13labintatlotresethirteen
20dalawampubeynte
(veinte)
twenty
21dalawampu’t-isabeynteuno
(veinte-uno)
twenty-one
30tatlumputrentathirty
40apatnapukwarentaforty
50limampusingkwentafifty
60animnapuseisentasixty
100isang daansiyentohundred
200dalawang daandos siyentostwo hundred
1,000isang libomilone thousand
2,000dalawang libodos miltwo thousand
10,000sampung libodies milten thousand
100,000isang daang libosiyento milone hundred thousand
1,000,000isang milyonmilyonone million
Baltic and Co., Manila Bulletin Online Edition

Ordinal Numbers

Ordinal numbers in Tagalog are formed by using the prefixes IKA– or PANGA–  before the counting numbers. For example, IKATLO (from ika + tatlo) or PANGATLO (from panga + tatlo) means “third” order. IKA may also be used to convey the order of time in a day or day in a month. For example, “IKATLO ng hapon” (third hour in the afternoon) or “IKA-DALAWAMPUT-ISA ng Enero” (the twenty-first of January).

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