Ang Alamat ng Palay

Tagalog Myths: The Origin of Rice

The Origin of Rice Background Rice is the staple food of Filipinos, and because of this this, we have many stories about rice plants or palay. Our ancestors used their stories to explain how palay was discovered as a crop and rice as a food. In this book, the origin of the palay is related to the livelihood of our ancestors before they became farmers. In the beginniRead More…

Maranao Myths: How the Angels Built Lake Lanao

How the Angels Built Lake Lanao Long ago there was no lake in Lanao. On the place where it is now situated, there flourished a mighty sultanate called Mantapoli. During the reign of Sultan Abdara Radawi, the greater grandfather of Radia Indarapatra (mythological hero of the Lanao Muslims), this realm expanded by military conquests and by dynastic marriages so that in time its fame spread far aRead More…

Maranao Myths: Eclipses

Eclipses Up in the sky lives a huge lion named Arimaonga. This animal sometimes gets playful, and it swallows the moon, thus producing an eclipse of the moon. Arimaonga is forced by the people to disgorge the moon by the noise they make during an eclipse of the moon, so people beat gongs and pluck their fingernails. The eclipse of the sun happens when one of the wheels of the chariot wRead More…

Iloko Myths: The First Monkey

The First Monkey Long ago in a thick forest, a young girl lived under the care of the goddess of weaving. Here she lived happily and without care, for everything that she wanted to eat was provided for her by her patroness. One day the goddess said to the girl, “Take this cotton, clean it, and make out a dress for yourself out of it.” Now, the girl knew nothing about making cloth Read More…

Iloko Myths: Gods and Goddesses

The Gods and the Goddesses Cabalangegan was a formerly a jungle at the edge of the river Abra. On the far side of the river were mountains, high and steep. On these mountains lived an old man named Abra, the father of Caburayan. The old man controlled the weather. It is said that the river Abra was covered by a gathering of water vapor at night, and during the days, it was Read More…

Ifugao Myths: Jars Brought from the Village

Bañggilit of Hinagañgan and the Jars He Brought from the Village of Souls A long time ago, before the coming of the Spaniards, there lived at Hinagañgan a man called Bañggilit. He was a wealthy man, possessing four rice granaries and a very large house; but he was not a priest. His constant desire was to hunt in the forest. One day Bañggilit went hunting in the forest and wasRead More…

Ifugao Myths: Why the Dead Come Back No More

Why the Dead Come Back No More A very long time ago, there lived a very kind woman with her three little children. She loved her children so much that she worked hard to be able to feed them. One day she fell ill, and in a short time she died. Her spirit went to Kadungayan, of course, as she lived a good life, but one night she thought of her poor little children whom she left on Read More…

Ibanag Myths: Why There is High Tide during a Full Moon

Why There is High Tide during a Full Moon Long, long ago only gods lived in this world, the earth, seas, and sky were ruled by three different powerful gods. The sun god, who ruled the sky, had a very beautiful daughter, Luna, the moon. Luna enjoyed going around the heavens in her golden chariot. One day she found herself taking another path which led her outside her kingdom. She wandered on uRead More…

Tagalog Myths: The Legend of Macapuno

The Legend of Macapuno In pre-Hispanic days, there was a lagoon that connected with the River Pasig, where later stood the Chinese Parian, near present Botanical Gardens. The Pasig lapped quietly against its banks. Sailing slowly past on the current were floating islands of water-plants, including patches of those resembling cabbages called quiapo, which that suburb is named after. Crocodiles-Read More…

Tagalog Myths: Legend of the Married River

Legend of Mag-asawang Tubig In the olden days, there was a small town in which a few farmers’ families lived.  Among them was the couple known as Ba Imo and Ba Sinta. They were well liked and respected in that place, for although they were well off, they were humble and generous. One day Bathala put them to the test. A beggar in tattered clothes came to their hRead More…